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The Guide to Doing Business in China provides an introduction to selected aspects relating to investment and business operations in the People’s Republic of China under current Chinese laws and policy during the COVID pandemic, including a summary of important areas of concern to all investors in China: mergers and acquisitions, data privacy issues, antitrust and competition issues, taxation, employment, intellectual property protection, trade and import and export rules, financial services, as well as anti-bribery compliance and dispute resolution issues.

The first wave of retaliatory tariffs against certain Chinese-origin goods (the so-called Section 301 duties) are set to terminate under the Trade Act of 1974. By statute, the measures terminate after 4 years unless an affected party benefitting from the tariffs submits a request to the United States Trade Representative that the action be continued within the final 60-days of the 4-year period. Once such a request is submitted, the USTR must conduct a review and determine whether the action should be continued. The first round of the Section 301 retaliatory tariffs on products of China, commonly known as “List 1,” was effective July 6, 2018, which means a request that this action be continued would need to be “submitted” between May 7, 2022 and July 6, 2022 to trigger USTR to conduct its review.

On 31st of March 2022, the Wise Persons on Challenges Facing the Customs Union (WPG) released its report on the future of the EU customs union. The WPG has been appointed by the Commissioner Gentiloni to reflect on the development of innovative ideas and concepts. This report aims to contribute to a general inter-institutional debate on the future of the customs union.