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Geoff Martin

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Geoff Martin is a Senior Associate at Baker McKenzie's Litigation and Government Enforcement practice group in Washington, DC. Geoff started his career in Baker McKenzie's London office in 2007 and moved to Washington DC in 2012. Geoff represents clients in matters before the federal government arising out of anti-corruption, trade sanctions, fraud, anti-money laundering, national security, and related enforcement actions. He also represents clients in civil and criminal matters in federal court. Geoff has extensive experience conducting internal investigations relating to such matters around the world.

The Fraud Section of the U.S. Department of Justice (“DOJ”) has retained Hui Chen as its full-time, resident Compliance Counsel. Ms. Chen has a significant background in compliance at various multinational companies. The retention of Ms. Chen and accompanying commentary from leadership of the DOJ’s Criminal Division last week highlight the U.S. government’s distinct expectations with respect to compliance. This development also sends a clear message about how important the DOJ considers compliance in the resolution of enforcement matters and how closely a company’s program will be scrutinized during that process.

On March 30, 2015 the US Federal Bureau of Investigations (FBI) announced that it was establishing three dedicated International Corruption Squads, based in New York, Washington D.C., and Los Angeles. These Squads, comprising FBI agents, analysts, and other professional staff, will be responsible for investigating violations of the U.S. Foreign…

Recent U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) enforcement actions and related commentary from Commission leadership demonstrate the SEC’s intent to penalize companies paying commercial bribes for violations of the accounting provisions of the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (“FCPA”). This trend belies a commonly held misconception that the FCPA pertains…

Prosecutors and regulatory agencies in the U.S. and elsewhere have long set expectations that, in order to maximize the prospect of receiving full cooperation credit (including any associated reduction in monetary penalties), the voluntary disclosure of corporate and/or individual wrongdoing must be made timely, genuinely, and in good faith. Several…