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Maxim Kalinin

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Maxim Kalinin serves as managing partner of Baker & McKenzie’s St. Petersburg office and head of the Mergers & Acquisitions, Corporate, Real Estate & Construction and Employment practice groups. He was named a European legal expert in Russia by European Legal Experts 2008, and was recognized by Chambers Europe "for his expertise in M&A and real estate work". He is also cited by Legal 500, Who’s Who Legal 2009, The International Who’s Who of Real Estate Lawyers 2008 and the Private Equity Handbook 2007/2008 for his corporate and real estate work

Baker McKenzie’s Sanctions Blog published the alert titled Real estate sale and purchase transactions between Russian persons and foreign persons affiliated with “unfriendly” states are now subject to government approval on 9 March 2022. Read the article via the link here. Please also visit our Sanctions Blog for the most recent updates.”

Starting from 13 July 2021, Russian credit institutions and other payment service providers are prohibited from interacting with illegal gambling and lotteries operators and foreign payment service providers who accept and transfer payments to illegal gambling and lottery operators. The restrictions are adopted by the Amendments to the Gambling Law (“Law”).

The Russian Federal Tax Service (the “FTS”) has issued a letter clarifying the provisions of Article 54.1 of the Russian Tax Code on tax avoidance, outlining a methodology for tax inspectorates on how to identify misrepresentations of business operations, check material facts and intent to use sham or “fly-by-night” companies. It also provides taxpayers with criteria for counterparty due diligence, which should eliminate the possibility of their subsequent tax liability.

In addition, the FTS has finally admitted the need for so-called “full tax reconstruction” (a comprehensive reclassification of transactions previously applied only by the courts) and the ability to deduct actual expenses for corporate profits tax purposes and to offset input VAT on transactions with sham companies. However, this is possible only if a taxpayer discloses the actual suppliers and financial terms in such transactions.