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On October 9, the Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) extended the comment period for the advance notice of proposed rulemaking (ANPRM) on criteria of “foundational technologies.” Comments may now be submitted through November 9, 2020; two weeks after the original deadline of October 26. BIS also clarified it will accept confidential business information from commenters. Filers submitting confidential information should clearly identify the confidential portion at the time of the submission and must file a statement “justifying nondisclosure and referring to the specific legal authority claimed.” Filers must also submit a public, non-confidential version of their submission. For electronic submissions, pages should be clearly marked as “BUSINESS CONFIDENTIAL” on the top of any page containing business confidential information. The corresponding non-confidential version of those comments must be clearly marked “PUBLIC.” The file name of the non-confidential version should begin with the character “P.”

Comments can be submitted by mail or via the Federal eRulemaking Portal. Our previous blog post on the solicitation of these public comments can be found here.

The authors acknowledge the assistance of Ryan Orange for this blog post.

Author

Terry Gilroy is a partner in the New York office of Baker McKenzie and a member of the Compliance and Investigations Practice Group. Prior to joining the Firm in 2018, Terry served as Americas Head of the Financial Crime Legal function at Barclays. Terry advises businesses and individuals on white collar and financial crime issues and has significant experience conducting investigations relating to compliance with the US Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) and related bribery and corruption statutes, economic sanctions regulations as administered by the US Department of the Treasury's Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC), and the Bank Secrecy Act and related anti-money laundering (AML) regulations and statutes. Terry spent six years on active duty in the United States Army as a Field Artillery officer.

Author

Lise Test, an associate in Baker & McKenzie’s International Trade Group in Washington, DC, practices in the area of international trade regulation and compliance — with emphasis on US export control laws, trade sanctions, anti-boycott laws and the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. Prior to joining Baker & McKenzie, Ms. Test served as a lawyer at the Danish Ministry of Defence where she focused on international public law and Danish torts, administrative law and military criminal law. In addition to her practice, Ms. Test also taught international humanitarian law and contract law at the Danish Royal Naval Academy.