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In brief

The Canada-United Kingdom Trade Continuity Agreement (Canada-UK TCA) replicates the Canada-European Union Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) on a bilateral basis. The Canada-UK TCA (signed December 2020) came into force from 1 January 2021 and aims to maintain the status quo in the trade relationship.


As a result, regulators in the UK and Canada will continue to accept batch testing and good manufacturing practice (GMP) certificates on a temporary basis, whilst domestic ratification procedures are underway in the UK and Canada to put a bespoke, comprehensive free trade agreement in place.

The Canada-UK TCA has been jointly agreed upon by the MHRA (UK regulator) and Health Canada’s Regulatory Operations and Enforcement Branch, accepting manufacturer’s batch testing certificates and avoiding re-control of that batch at import.

Agreements such as the Canada-UK TCA avoid disruption to trade. Before Brexit, the UK was automatically part of any EU trade deal. When the UK left, the EU had approximately 40 trade deals covering more than 70 countries. As of January 2021 the UK has made deals to continue trading in the same way with 60 of these countries, with talks ongoing in regards to a further six countries.

For more information please Harriet Jupp, Magda Tovar or Julia Gillert of our London office.

Author

Julia Gillert is an Associate in Baker McKenzie's London office.

Author

Magda Tovar joined Baker McKenzie in September 2019 as a Knowledge Lawyer for the Global Healthcare and Life Sciences Industry Group, covering healthcare and life sciences legal issues for -the EMEA region. She also supports the Industry Group at a global level on many knowledge management matters including thought leadership projects and global surveys. Before joining Baker McKenzie, Magda was a senior legal adviser at the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for 16 years where she advised on a broad spectrum of matters related to EU pharmaceutical law, covering medicines for human and veterinary use. She represented the EMA in cases before the General Court and the Court of Justice of the European Union.

Author

Harriet Annabel Jupp is a Trainee Solicitor in Baker McKenzie London office.