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Ilona Millar

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Ilona Millar is a partner in the Environmental Markets team at Baker McKenzie's Sydney office. Ilona is an environmental and projects lawyer with a diverse range of experience in domestic and international climate change, carbon markets, environmental law and policy, and a strong background in all aspects of water management, planning and projects. She joined the Firm in 2008 from the Foundation for International Environmental Law and Development, and International Institute for Environment and Development, in London. Ilona regularly writes, teaches and presents on environmental topics — she has lectured on environmental law, environmental markets and international climate change law at UNSW, Sydney University and University College London and for the past six years has co-coordinated the international climate change law course at ANU where she is a visiting fellow at the College of Law. Ilona's extensive pro bono work includes advising a number of developing country governments and non-government organizations on international climate change negotiations, and advising the Wentworth Group of Concerned Scientists on water and natural resource management law. She is listed among the best lawyers for Climate Change by Best Lawyers Australia 2016.

This report, the fourth in our Asia Pacific Business Renewal Series, explores how businesses are now fortifying their ESG efforts and pivoting from strategy to action. As businesses integrate ESG action into business renewal, there is an imperative to mitigate risks and pre-empt regulatory and compliance complexities amid uneven recovery and progress across jurisdictional and sectoral landscapes in the region.

With a recent influx of federal and state government funding, and the world’s largest green hydrogen project pipeline in place, Australia is well positioned to become a leading hydrogen producer and exporter. However, one outstanding aspect of this nascent industry – which could influence its future success – is the development of an internationally recognised certification scheme.

On 5 May 2021, the federal government announced its intention to make amendments to the National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting Regulations 2008 (the NGER Regulations) and National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting (Measurement) Determination 2008 (the Measurement Determination). The NGER Regulations outline the requirements for reporting entities under the NGER scheme and the Measurement Determination provides methods for estimating GHG emissions and the production and consumption of energy.

Share Sustainable Finance as a trend and financing option has grown exponentially and shows no signs of slowing down. In this series of short podcasts, our ESG Debt & Equity experts discuss key tips and things you should you when considering raising sustainable finance, including the ever-evolving legal and regulatory…

A new global paradigm for global climate action

President Elect Joseph R. Biden comes to office with what has, correctly, been called a “transformational” plan for action to curb climate change and to cope with its unavoidable consequences.

The cornerstone of his policy1 — officially called the Biden Plan for a Clean Energy Revolution and Environmental Justice — is to recommit the United States to the Paris Agreement on climate change, and to set a target for the US to achieve net-zero carbon emissions by 2050. That target is generally accepted as being in line with the goals of the Paris Agreement on climate change which seeks to limit global climate heating to well below 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels, and ideally, to keep it closer to 1.5 degrees.2

President-Elect Joseph R. Biden comes to office with what has, correctly, been called a “transformational” plan for action to curb climate change and to cope with its unavoidable consequences.

The cornerstone of his policy1 — officially called the Biden Plan for a Clean Energy Revolution and Environmental Justice — is to recommit the United States to the Paris Agreement on climate change, and to set a target for the US to achieve net-zero carbon emissions by 2050. That target is generally accepted as being in line with the goals of the Paris Agreement on climate change which seeks to limit global climate heating to well below 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels, and ideally, to keep it closer to 1.5 degrees.2

The impact of the world’s largest economy pivoting to this new policy cannot be understated. It is particularly important given that it tops off two months in which several of the world’s major economies have now announced net-zero commitments.

A new global paradigm for global climate action

President Elect Joseph R. Biden comes to office with what has, correctly, been called a “transformational” plan for action to curb climate change and to cope with its unavoidable consequences.

The cornerstone of his policy1 — officially called the Biden Plan for a Clean Energy Revolution and Environmental Justice — is to recommit the United States to the Paris Agreement on climate change, and to set a target for the US to achieve net-zero carbon emissions by 2050. That target is generally accepted as being in line with the goals of the Paris Agreement on climate change which seeks to limit global climate heating to well below 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels, and ideally, to keep it closer to 1.5 degrees.2

On September 23, 2020, Peru’s Ministry of Environment presented the digital platform “National Registry of Mitigation Measures” or Registro Nacional de Medidas de Mitigación – RENAMI during its participation in the 2020 NYC Climate Week. This is a milestone in Peru’s climate action plan and its transition to carbon neutrality.

The RENAMI is the first virtual platform in Latin America created to monitor compliance with a country’s Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC) under the Paris Agreement.

In brief The Supreme Court of Victoria has found liquidators can be made personally liable for clean-up costs in respect of land that was, on their appointment, polluted or environmentally hazardous as “occupiers” under the Environment Protection Act 1970 (Vic) (EP Act).[1] A disclaimer notice issued by the liquidators in respect…