Search for:
Author

Fernando Goldaracena

Browsing
Fernando Goldaracena is a partner in Baker McKenzie Buenos Aires Office. He heads the White Collar Crime Practice Group and is a member of the Compliance & Investigations Practice Group. Prior to joining the Firm, Fernando served as secretary of the Federal Criminal Court No. 2 of San Isidro, where he led several criminal investigations ranging from white collar crimes, public corruption and tax fraud. He is member of both the Compliance & Money Laundering and the Criminal Law Practice Groups of the City of Buenos Aires Bar Association (Colegio de Abogados de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires).

On 25 April 2022, the Anti-Corruption Office approved the System for Monitoring Private and Public Activities Before and After the Exercise of Public Function, with the purpose of collating and verifying compliance with public ethics regulations of individuals who enter and leave high-ranking public positions in the National Executive Branch.

In this edition of the anti-bribery and anti-corruption review, you will find an incisive overview of the legal and regulatory frameworks established to combat white-collar crime in major jurisdictions. With a focus on the practical implications of recent enforcement trends and policies, our lawyers examine key issues such as domestic and foreign bribery, associated offenses including money laundering, and best practices for internal compliance programs.

Argentina | October 6 2018 The Anticorruption Office Resolution 27/2018 (the “Resolution”) published yesterday, in the Official Gazette contains guidelines for companies to adapt their Compliance Programs as established in Sections 22 and 23 of the Law on Corporate Criminal Liability No. 27.401 (“Law 27,401”). The Resolution provides procedures very…

Since 2 March 2018, corporate criminal liability law (Law 27,401) is in force. Legal entities will be subject to sanctions in these offenses against the Public Administration and/or corruption: (i) national and transnational bribery and influence peddling; (ii) improper and unlawful transactions of public officials; (iii) illegal exaction committed by a public official; (iv) illicit enrichment of public officials and employees; and (v) forgery of balance sheets and reports to conceal a corruption offense.