Search for:
Author

Leticia Ribeiro C Figueiredo

Browsing
Leticia Ribeiro C. de Figueiredo joined the Firm in 1998, as a corporate trainee, and became partner in 2013. Until July 2003, she was primarily involved in M&A and Corporate Law, with experience in national and international M&A projects and corporate restructurings. From July 2003 on, she has been working exclusively in the Labor Law practice group. She has a wide breadth of experience with strategic litigation cases and relevant consultancy in individual and collective matters (i.e. restructuring, equity pay, PDVs – voluntary resignation program, PLRs – participation in profits or results, alteration of compensation plans and benefits), including national and international projects. Additionally, she works with collective bargaining agreements.

Inclusion and diversity are key factors today. As gender, racial, and ethnicity pay gaps have been slow to narrow, governments in Latin America have introduced more requirements to further reduce these differences.
In this quick overview, the Employment & Compensation group presents recent trends in pay equity in Latin America, highlighting critical issues to consider for your day-to-day decision-making.

As the constant changes in the region can affect companies’ operations, for effective decision making, it is vital to have updated information about the employment landscape in each of the jurisdictions.
In this quick overview, the Employment & Compensation group presents the main recent regulatory developments in Latin America, highlighting critical issues to consider.

It has become clear that flexibility is currency in the new working world and legal frameworks are evolving to catch up with the changing working culture. Four-day work-weeks, flexible working arrangements and the right to disconnect are all on offer to employees, giving the opportunity for better work-life balance, and giving employers a competitive edge in talent retention.

Artificial intelligence (AI) continues to transform the workplace. Much like in countries across the globe, the benefits of new AI technology are gaining traction in Latin America. However, employers should be aware of its risks, particularly in our regions’ context

Under Normative Rule 2,139, labor lawsuits will only need to be reported in the eSocial system starting July 2023. It may be understood that companies will not be required to include all ongoing labor lawsuits but only lawsuits with decisions no longer subject to appeal issued after the new July 2023 deadline, as well as those with impacts on employment obligations or tax, severance fund or social security payments.

Following the ruling issued on 8 June 2022, which determined that collective terminations require union involvement, Brazil’s Supreme Court has published on 25 April 2023 a new decision clarifying that such requirement applies to collective terminations implemented after 14 June 2022. The Supreme Court decision states that “prior union intervention is an essential procedural requirement for the collective termination of workers, which is not to be confused with prior authorization by the union or the signing of a collective agreement”.

Join us for a four-part webinar series as our US moderators welcome colleagues from around the globe to share the latest labor and employment law updates and trends. US-based multinational employers with business operations in Asia Pacific, Europe, the Middle East and Africa, and the Americas regions will hear directly from local practitioners on the major developments they need to know, and come away with practical tips and takeaways to implement.

Burnout in the workplace has become more widely recognized throughout the region. While workforce transformation is not a new concept for global organizations, the pandemic has forced us to rapidly adapt our standard ways of working and how we engage with employees, to ensure employee retention and the long-term viability of the business.
Per a study recently developed by Gallup, 43% of the world’s workers are experiencing daily stress and are, therefore, at risk of developing burnout. However, it was only recently that the World Health Organization included it as an occupational disease, which means that companies must be even more prepared to address and manage burnout cases properly. Lack of policies and protocols may aggravate risks for lack of proper employee support. Furthermore, many Latin American countries have undergone complex legal changes, which in many cases resulted in new regulations to protect employees in these situations.

With increased regulatory scrutiny and the emergence of employee activism, companies have experienced an elevated risk of trade secret disclosure from current or former employees acting as putative whistleblowers. In this episode, Aaron Goodman (Partner, Los Angeles) discussed key factors companies should consider in balancing their trade secret interests against the protections afforded to whistleblowers, with a focus on recent whistleblower laws across the globe.