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You can find current episodes (and subscription links) here. A brief description of each episode follows below and we hope you enjoy them: Episode 33: European Electronic Communications Code and the TMT Sector The European Commission opened infringement procedures against 24 member states on 4 February 2020, for failure to transpose the European…

Off the Shelf, the Global Consumer Goods & Retail Industry Podcast, provides short practical legal insights into the key issues affecting consumer goods and retail (CG&R) businesses. Episode 16: New Brand on the Block(chain): Consortium Considerations In the final episode of our blockchain for brands series, Alyssa Auberger, Baker McKenzie’s Chief…

On 14 October 2020, Luxembourg announced new provisions with respect to incentive for highly skilled and qualified workers (“Impatriate Regime”) as part of the 2021 budget bill (“Law”).1

The Impatriate Regime was introduced back in 20112 and was further amended by several circulars, including the most recent Circular LIR No. 95/2 dated 27 January 2014 (“Circular”) which have been repealed in the meantime. The government has now decided to codify the Impatriate Regime under Article 115(13) b. of the Luxembourg income tax law (LITL) and to introduce some limited changes.

The aim of Article 115(13) b. of the LITL remains close to the original objective of the Circular, which was to further enhance the competitiveness of Luxembourg by enabling Luxembourg employers to hire new talent from abroad. The changes introduced by the Law should further simplify the procedure, strengthening the clear intention of Luxembourg to remain attractive from an economic perspective.

Below we describe the regime that will be applicable as from 1 January 2021 while highlighting the main changes compared to the former rules.

In this recording of our introductory workshop, Baker McKenzie FinTech Legal Accelerator: Cracking the Legal Code, held as part of the Hong Kong FinTech Week 2020, our lawyers across Asia Pacific give an overview of key fintech issues that start-ups or scale-ups need to know as they grow and expand…

The Australian Government has released comprehensive terms of reference and an issues paper (“Issues Paper”) as part of its long-awaited review of the Australian Privacy Act 1988 (Cth) (“Privacy Act”). The review forms part of the government’s response in December 2019 to recommendations in the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission’s (ACCC) Digital Platforms Inquiry (“DPI Report”) to strengthen privacy laws in Australia. It marks the first of two papers seeking public input on the Privacy Act.

In brief On September 24, 2020, the Franchise Tax Board of California (the FTB) released a proposed regulation — new section 17951-8 of Title 18 of the California Code of Regulations — which treats the compensation of a California nonresident, non-employee director of a corporation as California-source income subject to California personal income…