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Praween Chantanakomes

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Praween Chantanakomes is an associate at Baker & McKenzie’s Bangkok office. He was admitted in 2008. He is currently active in the Corporate & Commercial, Mergers & Acquisitions, Environment, Natural Resources, and Pharmaceuticals practice groups.

Healthtech gained tremendous attention during the past year or so as a result of the pandemic-driven lockdowns and restrictive circumstances. As we discussed in the past, government agencies around the world had invariably leveraged technology to support healthcare delivery and services over the years, and these efforts have accelerated in response to the pandemic. In the case of Thailand, based on its 10 year national health security plan, the Ministry of Public Health has progressed and implemented its policy by working with relevant government agencies such as the Food and Drug Administration, the Medical Council of Thailand, the Pharmacy Council and the National Broadcasting and Telecommunications Commission to develop and issue guidelines for telehealth services.

In our previous newsletters, we explored the first two key legal obligations of non-financial businesses under the Money Laundering Control Act, B.E. 2542 (1999): reporting obligations and know-your-customer (KYC) and customer due diligence (CDD) procedures. In this article we will discuss the third and fourth key legal obligations: implementing internal policies and procedures to address the risk of money laundering, and coordinating with the Anti-Money Laundering Office (AMLO) to provide training for personnel.

The Ministry of Public Health has issued notifications to amend the list of formula of Thai traditional medicine containing cannabis under the Herbal Product Act which is allowed for use to treat a disease or for research, and to amend the information, warnings or precautions required to be displayed on the package inserts of Thai traditional medicine containing cannabis.

Join the regulatory affairs specialists in our Bangkok office’s Healthcare & Life Sciences Industry Group at this insightful webinar to get an overview of the key issues which you should consider when undertaking a regulatory compliance audit as applicable to pharmaceuticals, medical devices, foods and cosmetics (including considerations based on recent legal updates), as well as the steps that may be taken to ensure you stay compliant and avoid unnecessary pitfalls.

This episode goes over the final four fundamental elements of the National Anti-Corruption Commission’s guidelines. These elements are: personnel should have accurate books and accounting records, human resource management policies complementary to anti-bribery measures, companies should have communication mechanisms that encourage the reporting of the suspicion of bribery (whistleblowing), and companies need to review and evaluate anti-bribery prevention measures and their effectiveness.

This episode goes over the first two fundamental elements of the National Anti-Corruption Commission’s guidelines. The first guidance is where companies’ internal control measures should be strong, visible policies and supported by top-level management to prevent bribery. The second guidance is that companies should conduct risk assessments to effectively identify and evaluate exposure to bribery to government officials.

In our previous article in the healthcare transaction series, we highlighted the need to review a target’s supply chain as one of the key areas and issues that one should pay attention to when carrying out a due diligence investigation on a healthcare & life sciences (HLS) target. This exercise in revisiting one’s supply chain in light of the COVID-19 pandemic and emerging industry trends, including (among others) digital transformation, will ensure that the company’s supply chain is resilient, compliant, and ready to meet the challenges and opportunities in the HLS industry.