Search for:
Author

Maurice Bellan

Browsing
Maurice Bellan is a Washington, DC. based partner and is Vice-Chair of the Firm's North America Litigation and Government Enforcement Practice Group. He also leads the Firm's False Claims Act practice and advises clients on a broad range of fraud and anti-corruption matters. Maurice is a former trial attorney at the US Department of Justice and has been named by Savoy magazine as one of the most influential African-American lawyers in the United States.range of concerns involving fraud and anti-corruption, focusing on the US Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and the False Claims Act. A former criminal investigator and trial lawyer at the US Department of Justice, Mr. Bellan has over 20 years of complex investigative, civil and criminal litigation experience. He was a former member of the judicial nominating committee of the Maryland bar and has served on the boards of organizations such National Senior Campuses, Inc. and the Downtown Columbia Arts & Culture Commission.

Welcome to Baker McKenzie’s Suspension & Debarment Corner. Here you will find the latest information, trends and enforcement actions related to government procurement, including suspension and debarment, bid protests, False Claims Act defense and related topics. Calling upon our deep bench of 4000+ lawyers and legal professionals worldwide, we will occasionally call upon guest practitioners to  write about related topics including white collar criminal convictions or civil judgments relating to fraud, antitrust violations, theft, bribery, and tax evasion. Readers can expect to find practical guidance and tips for compliance with public procurement policies as well as best practices for managing allegations of misconduct.

Last week, the US Supreme Court rejected two petitions, Care Alternatives v. United States, 2021 U.S. LEXIS 915 (Feb. 22, 2021) and RollinsNelson LTC Corp. v. United States ex. rel. Winters, 2021 U.S. LEXIS 1045 (Feb. 22, 2021) that could have helped resolve a circuit split involving the US. False Claims Act, 31 U.S.C. §§ 3729 – 3733 (“FCA” or “Act”). The petitions sought to determine whether the FCA requires evidence of “objective falsity” in order to establish a violation of the Act.

READ REPORT IN ENGLISH READ REPORT IN SPANISH READ REPORT IN MANDARIN The Year Ahead – our publication looking at key developments in global litigation and arbitration for 2021 – is now available in English, Spanish and Mandarin. COVID-19 and its effects have triggered many disputes, with litigation volumes in…

As the inauguration of the forty-sixth president of the United States approaches, the fragility of supply remains a critical lesson-learned from the COVID-19 pandemic. Our new report, in partnership with the Atlantic Council, explores how the next US administration can work alongside partners and allies in the Western Hemisphere to…

Read full article This article published in the Government Contracting Law Report discusses the U.S. Department of Justice’s Guidelines for Taking Disclosure, Cooperation, and Remediation into Account in False Claims Act Matters, which identify various factors that the Department will consider in issuing credit to companies that voluntarily disclose misconduct…

On 7 May 2019, the US Department of Justice issued Guidelines for Taking Disclosure, Cooperation, and Remediation into Account in False Claims Act Matters, which identify various factors that the Department will consider in issuing credit to companies that voluntarily disclose misconduct that could serve as the basis for False…

Announcement of Policy Revisions Reflects a More Practical, Flexible Enforcement Approach The US Justice Department has adjusted its approach to holding individuals, and not only corporations, responsible for improper conduct. In remarks at the ACI’s FCPA conference on November 29, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein softened the DOJ’s formal policy…

President Trump signed an executive order calling for increased monitoring and enforcement of laws that require — or express a preference for — domestic goods, services, and labor. Trump’s order requires more rigorous enforcement of “Buy American” laws that require agencies and government contractors to procure goods, products or materials that are produced in the United States.