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Peter P. Tomczak

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Peter Tomczak serves as the Chair of Baker McKenzie's North America Litigation and Government Enforcement Practice Group. Peter serves on the North America Pricing Committee, and oversees the practice group's development and review of non-hourly fee based arrangements, or AFAs. He joined Baker McKenzie in 2003, after having served as a law clerk for the Delaware Court of Chancery.

On 15 September 2022, Deputy Attorney General Lisa Monaco issued a memorandum to Department of Justice prosecutors entitled “Further Revisions to Corporate Criminal Enforcement Policies Following Discussions with Corporate Crime Advisory Group”. As has become common in recent years (with a brief intermission under Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein who objected to the practice), such memoranda and other Department pronouncements have come to herald key developments in DOJ policy on corporate criminal enforcement and related practice. These memoranda are therefore closely watched by the defense bar and corporate counsel alike.

The most comprehensive guide of its kind, the Global Attorney-Client Privilege Guide is an interactive resource covering the law and best practices on privilege in 34 key jurisdictions.
The up-to-date understanding of the law of privilege found in the Guide helps companies to maximize the available protections and ensure that, where possible, privilege is maintained.
When litigation is threatened, companies whose employees know how to recognize and protect privileged information are better prepared to respond to the risks.

Our annual report, The Year Ahead: Global Disputes Forecast 2022, addresses key trends in the disputes landscape around the globe, and we invite you to join us for a webinar series focused on key issues identified in the report including litigation preparedness, ESG, digital transformation and healthcare and life sciences.

In 2010, public Delaware corporations began adopting forum provisions to require various types of “intra-entity” disputes — claims that directors breached their fiduciary duties in approving a sale transaction — be made solely in Delaware courts. However, over the past decade, this has now been shaped into a boilerplate provision under U.S. securities law.