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Diogo Oliveira

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Diogo Duarte de Oliveira is a partner in charge of the Tax Department of Baker McKenzie's Luxembourg office. He has over 16 years of experience. Prior to joining Baker McKenzie in 2019, Diogo was tax partner and head of tax at the top-ranked practice of a Benelux leading law firm. He was also an international corporate tax manager with a Big Four audit firm in Luxembourg (and in Mexico City as a secondee).

Episode 21: COP26 Key Takeaways for Sovereign Wealth Funds
In this episode of FInsight, Andrew Hedges and Kay She from Baker McKenzie’s EMI group in London discuss their experience and observations while on the ground in Glasgow. They cover business imperatives and challenges affecting the global economy and how sovereign wealth funds are well-positioned to influence and make an impact on broader sustainability goals and action plans. As discussions on climate-related issues evolve from commitments to execution in the recent COP26 UN Climate Change Conference, we unpack some of the key takeaways relevant for sovereign wealth funds.

In March 2021, the EU approved new reporting rules in a directive known as DAC7. The directive will require the operators of online platforms for the sale of goods and certain services, to collect, verify and share data on their sellers and their transactions concluded on the online platform. EU member states have until 31 December 2022 to implement DAC7 into national law. Certain platform operators will become a reporting platform and will need to start collecting and verifying data points in compliance with the DAC7 reporting requirements. The collected data points must be reported to the tax authorities of the relevant EU member state annually.

In the aftermath of COVID-19 and the resulting low-yielding environment, sovereign actors are looking more than ever to real estate, infrastructure, private equity, private debt and other alternative assets for strategic investment opportunities.

In brief On 8 January 2021, the Luxembourg tax authorities released Circular L.I.R. No. 168bis/1 (“Circular”) providing guidance on the application of the interest deduction limitation rule introduced by the Law of 21 December 2018 (“Law”) implementing the Anti-Tax Avoidance Directive (EU) 2016/1164 of 12 July 2016 (ATAD). According to…

On 28 January 2021, the Luxembourg Parliament (Chambre des Députés) adopted1 bill of law 7547 on the non-deductibility of interest and royalty payments made to related parties in non-cooperative jurisdictions (“Law”).

As explained in our tax alert dated 20 April 2020, the new provision amends Article 168 of the Luxembourg Income Tax Law (LITL), which lists non-deductible expenses for taxpayers subject to corporate income tax. The Law therefore completes the scope of non-deductible expenses by adding a rule of non-deductibility of interest or royalty expenses paid by a Luxembourg taxpayer to a related company established in a country or territory appearing on the list of the EU as a non-cooperative tax jurisdiction.

On 14 October 2020, Luxembourg announced new provisions with respect to incentive for highly skilled and qualified workers (“Impatriate Regime”) as part of the 2021 budget bill (“Law”).1

The Impatriate Regime was introduced back in 20112 and was further amended by several circulars, including the most recent Circular LIR No. 95/2 dated 27 January 2014 (“Circular”) which have been repealed in the meantime. The government has now decided to codify the Impatriate Regime under Article 115(13) b. of the Luxembourg income tax law (LITL) and to introduce some limited changes.

The aim of Article 115(13) b. of the LITL remains close to the original objective of the Circular, which was to further enhance the competitiveness of Luxembourg by enabling Luxembourg employers to hire new talent from abroad. The changes introduced by the Law should further simplify the procedure, strengthening the clear intention of Luxembourg to remain attractive from an economic perspective.

Below we describe the regime that will be applicable as from 1 January 2021 while highlighting the main changes compared to the former rules.

On May 25 2018, the Council of the European Union adopted a directive concerning the mandatory automatic exchange of information in the field of taxation, in relation to reportable cross-border arrangements (Council Directive (EU) 2018/822).  This EU mandatory disclosure regime, known as the DAC6 Directive, aims to increase transparency by requiring intermediaries and, in certain circumstances, taxpayers, to report cross-border transactions that are deemed to represent aggressive tax planning.

In brief Luxembourg Prime Minister, Mr. Bettel, announced on 13 October 2020 some new tax measures during the state of the nation speech. You may recall that a structural tax reform to take place in 2021 was announced by the Minister of Finance, Mr. Gramegna, in July 2019. The Covid-19 outbreak has…